Trespassers, delay and rhyme

Waiting for a railway train
to take me to my home
I’ll sit and write a poem
on the station on my own
It’s peaceful here, conducive
to find a little rhyme
and scribble down a verse or two
line by line by line

My train arrives, I find a seat
but at the station here we stay
The tannoy tells us trespassers
ahead are causing fray
They’re up there messing on the track
some way up ahead
So I’m not heading homeward now
Stuck right here instead

The conductor’s walking up and down
keeping us informed
But it looks as though we may be here
a while, we have been warned
Still, looking on the brighter side
As things could of course be worse
It means that I can finish off
this witty little verse

©Jemverse

Photo – a deserted Durrington-on-Sea station, Sussex, UK – Jempics

[PS – I did eventually get home – took over two hours though]

Rhythm of the rails

Rhythm of the rails
strikes a resonant chord
Music for the morning
and the commuter hoard
Newspapers folded
Tablets fired up
with caffeine boosters
from paper cup
Gathering momentum
into the Weald
Heading for London
through Sussex field

Distorted, the tannoy
every once in a while
interrupts with a word
for a frown or a smile
And cocooned within
the journey begun
We listen and roll
to the clatter and thrum
But the words like the rhythm
(if only they knew)
is only heard here
by the still awake few

For this is eclectic
ethereal, rare
with the tune heard only
by those with a care
Rhythm of rails though
has a place in my heart
for I’m attuned to the music
which I heard from the start
And it soothes as I listen
and tap along to the beat
with the clatter and thrum
from my window seat

©Jemverse

Photo – Jempics

Into the sun

I’m heading east to Essex
It’s very wet out there
There are raindrops on the window
But I don’t at present care
For I am warm and dry
On a quiet commuter train
On my way to Southend Central
Quite protected from the rain

And in the sky above me
A brightness has begun
So when I reach my destination
I may well see the sun

©Jemverse

Photo – Rain through the window of a C2C train in Essex, UK – Jempics

Argyll Street

Central station, Argyll Street
running through the city
towers in its grandeur still
above the street and pretty

Once proudly known at Westergait
and over two miles long
Four hundred years of history
adds to Glasgow’s song

And though its heritage has changed
with progress over time
It’s vista is undaunted as
Argyll Street still looks fine

©Jemverse

Photo (Jempics) – Central Station, Argyll Street Bridge, Glasgow. Opened in 1879. Extended in 1901. Originally known as Westergait, Argyll Street led west from Trongate to the city’s West Port, the western gate out of the city’s walls. It was renamed in honour of the Duke of Argyll, some time after the removal of the West Port in 1751, as a result of the expansion of the city westward.

Delays

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Stuck on a train at East Croydon
We’re moving at one mile an hour
Looks like I’m going to be rather late
for my seminar in Euston Tower

No reason has been given to us
But with all of the trains on the line
I don’t think I’ll be seeing London
now for what may be quite some time

Still, I have my music and my poetry book
so I’ve plenty to occupy me
for the time this journey takes to complete
However long that might be!

©Jemverse

Photo – East Croydon station from the late running 08:46 out of Shoreham-by-Sea. As it transpired, the train was just over an hour late getting into London Victoria. C’est la vie! – Jempics

A whistle, a puff of steam and a smile

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Sitting in the sunshine
with a welcome cup of tea
I heard a far off whistle
echoing ‘cross the green valley
And there, across the fields
with a puff of whitened steam
a train left Bodiam station
trundling through the Sussex green

It was a lovely picture
and with my camera close at hand
I made certain that I captured
it’s journey through the land
We watched it as it trundled
disappearing in a while
on its way to Tenterden
leaving us a smile.

©Jemverse

Bodiam station was closed back in 1961 but re-opened in 2000 to become part of the Kent and East Sussex Heritage Railway. The ten-mile stretch of line runs between Tenterden in Kent and Bodiam.

Train a-trundles

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Train a-trundles daily
inland from the sea
cross a river, through the fields
familiar to me
A journey I know all too well
although it differs every day
as the scenery changes
when the weather has its say

Sometimes it is murky
river mist obscures the view
And on other days the sunshine
brings a squint and all’s askew
Some days it is raining
and there’s a monotone of grey
But when there’s blue sky overhead
there is colour every day

Train a-trundles through the winter
when sometimes it is white
A panoramic vista that
provides a lovely sight
And it trundles through the spring
and yes, the summer too
onward into autumn
with its red and golden hue

It doesn’t take me very long
Twenty minutes either way
but it’s regular most working weeks
though not quite every day
And the nicest thing about it
is as I’m travelling through
I can never tire of seeing
something every time anew

©Jemverse

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