Rhythm of the rails

Rhythm of the rails
strikes a resonant chord
Music for the morning
and the commuter hoard
Newspapers folded
Tablets fired up
with caffeine boosters
from paper cup
Gathering momentum
into the Weald
Heading for London
through Sussex field

Distorted, the tannoy
every once in a while
interrupts with a word
for a frown or a smile
And cocooned within
the journey begun
We listen and roll
to the clatter and thrum
But the words like the rhythm
(if only they knew)
is only heard here
by the still awake few

For this is eclectic
ethereal, rare
with the tune heard only
by those with a care
Rhythm of rails though
has a place in my heart
for I’m attuned to the music
which I heard from the start
And it soothes as I listen
and tap along to the beat
with the clatter and thrum
from my window seat

©Jemverse

Photo – Jempics

Into the sun

I’m heading east to Essex
It’s very wet out there
There are raindrops on the window
But I don’t at present care
For I am warm and dry
On a quiet commuter train
On my way to Southend Central
Quite protected from the rain

And in the sky above me
A brightness has begun
So when I reach my destination
I may well see the sun

©Jemverse

Photo – Rain through the window of a C2C train in Essex, UK – Jempics

Travel & flowers

It’s going to be a busy week
and I’ll be travelling a lot
So I’ll not mind so much
if the weather’s not as hot
London now it’s Monday
Southend on the morrow
Then Lincoln Thursday morning
returning Friday when I’ll borrow…

…a few of those long travelling hours
for a weekend with a rest
Before London comes around again
on Monday next no less
And to keep my sanity intact
I’ll be thinking of these flowers
as I traverse the length of England
over several long hours

©Jemverse

Photo – Jempics

Argyll Street

Central station, Argyll Street
running through the city
towers in its grandeur still
above the street and pretty

Once proudly known at Westergait
and over two miles long
Four hundred years of history
adds to Glasgow’s song

And though its heritage has changed
with progress over time
It’s vista is undaunted as
Argyll Street still looks fine

©Jemverse

Photo (Jempics) – Central Station, Argyll Street Bridge, Glasgow. Opened in 1879. Extended in 1901. Originally known as Westergait, Argyll Street led west from Trongate to the city’s West Port, the western gate out of the city’s walls. It was renamed in honour of the Duke of Argyll, some time after the removal of the West Port in 1751, as a result of the expansion of the city westward.

Excited

I’m on my way to Gatwick
to board a big jet plane
which’ll take me up to Glasgow
on my travels once again

It’s quite a way, four hundred miles
and sixty-six point two
so I’m pleased that I am flying
from home to my venue

And I’m really quite excited
as flying is a treat
First come first served at check-in
Hope I get a window seat

I’ve never been to Glasgow
so I’ll be writing there for sure
the experience to share with you
when I’m at home once more

©Jemverse

Photo – flying out of Gatwick over Southern England – Jempics

Oval

The amazing oval ceiling
of the Corn Exchange in Leeds
Once famed for giving merchants
a place to barter seeds

Still gives a home to traders
now though of a different kind
Shoppers still come hoping
a bargain here to find

And today one in particular
came for a look around
and paused to take a picture
of the wonder there he found

©Jemverse

Leeds Corn Exchange was designed by Cuthbert Brodrick and opened in 1864. The dome design was based on that of the Bourse de commerce of Paris by François-Joseph Bélanger and François Brunet, completed in 1811

Photo – Jempics

Ye olde trip to Jerusalem

Underneath the castle walls
in the bright sunshine
Eight hundred years and some have passed
of serving ale and wine

Ye Olde trip to Jerusalem
is the place I mention
The oldest pub in England
stands here with good intention

So whilst visiting fair Nottingham
with a toast to passing years
I spent a pleasant lunchtime
with two of their fine beers

©Jemverse

Photo – Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem, Nottingham, UK. Carved directly out of the rock underneath the castle, Ye Olde Trip has been here since 1189 and famously served the Crusaders on their way to Jerusalem.

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