Fire and Glass

Sat a while in Junkyard Dog
to hear the music play
Guitars, fiddle, vocals too
September Saturday

Good conversation flowing
here for private view
Fire drawings by my daughter
Sal’s glass for something new

Junkyard Dog the setting
Artwork from my family
Six Crouchers here together
in Brighton by the sea

©Jemverse

Photo – glass by Sally Croucher; burnt wood drawings by Emily Rose Croucher – Jempics. [Junkyard Dog is a cafe in the Kemp Town area of Brighton, East Sussex, UK]

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The Desert Quartet

He’s just one of four
by Elizabeth Frink
looking down on me now
as I sip a hot drink
‘The Desert Quartet’
adorn the arcade
there from the eighties
when they were made

Pride they have mustered
as the years come and go
looking down on the people
who walk to and fro
And here they will stay
in Worthing I think
an epitaph to
Dame Elizabeth Frink

©Jemverse

“The Desert Quartet” (1985) – Montague Shopping Arcade, Worthing, West Sussex – by Dame Elizabeth Frink (1930-1993). Photos – Jempics

Oasis of Lovely

Amongst the towering walls of glass
the concrete and the steel
a sculpture hanging in the trees
is calming and genteel

Some will pass it unaware
heads buried in the sand
looking at the mobile glow
they carry in their hand

But some will see it hanging there
and pause a little while
to ponder at its meaning
and allow time for a smile

©Jemverse

Photo – tree sculpture on Euston Road, London – Jempics

When we write

2 of 5 in the Jemverse ‘Poets’ series

In the small hours I sat
with my pen and I wrote
for the words were just flowing
and worthy of note
And they weren’t telling stories
at least, not ones of fiction
yet their eloquence still
came alive with their diction

And gave me a mission
I just had to commit
to the paper before me
with a whim and a wit
Words of a poet
with his art in the night
as such is the challenge
we have when we write

©Jemverse

2 in a series of 5 poems written about poetry for poets. Photo – Jempics.

In Constable’s footsteps

Went to Brighton to see the original
on short loan from the Tate
It’s quite a lot bigger than the one on my wall
and to see it there was great

A Constable retrospective
representing four years’ toils
When he lived right here in Brighton
with some drawings and some oils

It was a special privilege
to see these works all here
and in particular for me
the original ‘Chain Pier’

©Jemverse

Photo – my print copy of John Constable’s ‘The Chain Pier, Brighton’ (1826-27) ; Tate Britain – Jempics

John Constable took lodgings in Brighton between 1824 and 1828 during which he drew and painted a lot of what he saw around him. ‘In Constable’s Footsteps’ at Brighton Museum brings all of that output together for the first time in an exhibition running until 8 October 2017.

The Chain Pier was Brighton’s first pier. Built in 1823 but destroyed by a storm in 1896, you can still see remains of its oak pilings at very low tides today.

Jolly Early

It’s awfully jolly early
to be up on a weekend
But we’re off (us two) to London
to visit an old friend
And as we’re paid up members
we get an early special tour
There before the crowds get in
what our membership is for

So we left the house at five o’clock
caught the red-eye up the line
At Victoria just after seven
just at breakfast time
Then a quick tube down to Pimlico
for David Hockney at the Tate
arriving a bit early
as we don’t like being late

Later on we’ll take the boat
down the Thames a little way
Tate Modern down on Southbank
getting there around midday
And then when we have had our fill
of both galleries I guess
that we’ll partake of something nice
at a restaurant no less

Still later we might take a stroll
by the riverbank a while
Taking in the city sights
for around about a mile
And finally we’ll catch a tube
on the District/Circle line
Leaving London in mid afternoon
to get home by suppertime

©Jemverse

Photo – David Hockney in front of his ‘The Arrival of Spring in Woldgate, East Yorkshire, 2011’, a 32-canvas panel combined to make the whole – Daily Telegraph, UK.

Pleasure

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We brought a David Hockney print
and hung it on the wall
An early Christmas present
to be admired by one and all
It’s from a London retrospective
at the Royal Academy
to which just under four years past
we went, my wife and me

Called ‘The Bigger Picture’
the exhibition was
all about the landscapes
from the Yorkshire Wolds because
they deserve such recognition
so wonderful are they
and to us an inspiration
on that very special day

Our print is aptly titled as
“The arrival of the Spring”
and feature forest down in Woodgate
under Mr Hockney’s wing
It reality it’s massive
(thirty-one feet wide)
But our print’s a little smaller
so we could fit it here inside

It’s a joy to have a picture
which brings pleasure by the day
A thing of special beauty
to keep the blues at bay
And to us this David Hockney
with its capture of the Spring
encapsulates the essence
joy and pleasure seek to bring

©Jemverse

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