Bussokuseki III

Bussokuseki
This poetic triplicate
ends today with this
Now it’s found there will be more
Art is never satisfied
Never still the poet’s pen

©Jemverse

Photo – Jempics

The Bussokuseki-kahi (仏足石歌碑) is a well-known monument in the Yakushi Temple in Nara, inscribed with twenty-one poems

The poems are written in Man’yōgana, a precursor to kana where Chinese characters are used for their phonetic value, and in Bussokuseki-style. Named after the poems, Bussokuseki-style is an archaic poetic device in which lines are written in a 5-7-5-7-7-7 mora pattern. It is an early form of waka.

Bussokuseki II

Finding words to form
to syllabic sequencing
always a pleasure
Challenging but daily done
Satisfaction guaranteed
with bussokuseki found

©Jemverse

The Bussokuseki-kahi (仏足石歌碑) is a well-known monument in the Yakushi Temple in Nara, inscribed with twenty-one poems

The poems are written in Man’yōgana, a precursor to kana where Chinese characters are used for their phonetic value, and in Bussokuseki-style. Named after the poems, Bussokuseki-style is an archaic poetic device in which lines are written in a 5-7-5-7-7-7 mora pattern. It is an early form of waka.

Bussokuseki I

Bussokuseki
Japanese poetic form
In the form of five
and then three sets of seven
for syllabic sequencing
Tanka with an extra phrase

©Jemverse

Photo – Jempics

The Bussokuseki-kahi (仏足石歌碑) is a well-known monument in the Yakushi Temple in Nara, inscribed with twenty-one poems

The poems are written in Man’yōgana, a precursor to kana where Chinese characters are used for their phonetic value, and in Bussokuseki-style. Named after the poems, Bussokuseki-style is an archaic poetic device in which lines are written in a 5-7-5-7-7-7 mora pattern. It is an early form of waka.

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