The Tap & Spile

Mirrored lights reflected
in the water here at night
The mystery is magical
and a captivating sight

The Gas Street footbridge shadowed
‘Neath the tower of The Cube
which looms up there behind it
malevolent and huge

But reflected in the water
The Tap & Spile remains
welcoming in the passer-by
to warming log-fire flames

©Jemverse

The Tap & Spile on the Birmingham & Worcester canal side in Birmingham dates from 1821. A ‘spile’ is the small wooden peg used to ‘stop’ or ‘broach’ a keg in order to draw off liquid (such as beer). The Cube, designed by Ken Shuttleworth, was completed in 2010 at a cost of £100 million. 

A colourful story

Colourfully painted
they have seen many days
Sitting next to smokestacks
on England’s waterways
Functional yet lovely
water for the boat
Keeping engines running
flotilla here afloat

Inanimate, their story
over all the many years
would cover several pages
but will never reach our ears
So here’s some inspiration
to help you on your way
Captured when I saw them
in the sunshine yesterday

©Jemverse

 

Slowly

Reflected in the water
Tower blocks in the sun
On the Worcester and the Birmingham
canal, which is quite fun
A peaceful little wander
Present blending with the past
where pace is somewhat slower
that the city where it’s fast

©Jemverse

 

Gas Street Basin

The Gas Street Basin barges
look lovely in a line
Here in the heart of Birmingham
peaceful and sublime
Once this would have bristled
with industrial ingress
But now it is a haven
free from turmoil or distress
Testament to memory
preserved in the best way
And perfect for the passer-by
at any time of day

©Jemverse

 

The Canalhouse

It’s quite a surprise
when popping in for a beer
to find that the pub
has its own canal here!

But that’s just the case
here in Nottingham city
Though a former museum
had to close, more’s the pity

The Canalhouse though
with clever adaption
keeps the history alive
with its central attraction

©Jemverse

 

The Canalhouse on the Nottingham Canal in Canal Street, Nottingham, UK is a former canal museum. The site is now home to Nottingham’s Castle Rock Brewery and its flagship pub. The Grade II listed building retains much of its former heritage, including a branch of the Nottingham Canal complete with resident barges which splits its interior. 

The Nottingham and Beeston

In Nottingham the waters
of the canal are quite tranquil
with new building now reflected
in the waters quiet and still
Iron rings along the towpath
remain in situ there
Yet no more to fasten barges
with slow horses unaware

Those days to passing memory
are I’m afraid resigned
Another age and fashion
to this place are now aligned
In fact the only traffic
in this peaceful place today
is my good self composing
some words along the way

©Jemverse

 

A quiet moment

I’m at the Angel Islington
in the heart of London town
Waiting by the tunnel
for traffic to come down
There are watercraft here waiting
close to where I am
Engines chugging in a queue
A canal boat traffic jam

The water, green and sluggish
reflects a bygone time
rekindled by these barges here
all waiting in a line
And despite the close proximity
to London’s furious pace
It’s so very quiet and peaceful
that down here that’s not the case

 

©Jemverse
[5 September 2016]

The Islington Tunnel carries the Regent’s Canal Arm of the Grand Union Canal for 960 yards (878 m) underneath the Angel area of Islington, in London.

Wilford Street Bridge

‘Neath the Wilford Street Bridge

Where the old water flows

Castle lock hides the secret

That only passing time knows

Over a century now of traffic

Depleted through the years

Its industrial heyday hidden

Behind twenty-first century tears

Yet in the midst of this sorrow

Is the occasional smile

As a narrowboat passes

Every once in a while

©Jemverse

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