Korcula

5 of 16 in the Jemverse ‘Venetian Vistas’ series

To Korcula by tender
Inside the city wall
I climbed the tower of St Marks
some thirty metres tall

The view across the rooftops
full of terracotta red
took my breath away, although
the drop filled me with dread

But I made it back down safely
to walk streets of ancient stone
on this island in Croatia
Marco Polo once called home

©Jemverse

Photo – Korcula island – Dalmation coast – Croatia – Jempics

Korcula island has no dock big enough for cruise ships, so we went ashore via tender. The fortified town of the same name is encircled by high stone walls of Venetian origin in the centre of which is the cathedral of St Mark with its 30-metre high tower. It’s believed that Marco Polo was born on the island

Oasis

Sat in St Nicholas’ churchyard
high up on the hill
overlooking Brighton
with all around me still

Sipped a bold, strong coffee
the sunshine breaking through
with history around me
which from my past I knew

There’s change around about of course
new buildings stark and cold
yet Brighton’s essence here remains
quintessentially old

A haven with a tranquil peace
God’s hand is present here
A little bit of heaven
with the bustling city near

©Jemverse

Photo – St Nicholas’ Churchyard, Brighton, East Sussex, UK (founded 1091) – Jempics

Viaduct

The viaduct on London Raod
Brighton, late at night
lit up blue with vibrancy
is a lovely sight

High above the city streets
with Victorian pride
to carry trains up there on which
so many people ride

But down here close to midnight
just a passing car
and me with phone to capture
this spectacular

©Jemverse

The London Road Viaduct, Brighton, East Sussex was built in 1845-6 by James Orpeth Rastick. It has 27 arches and is now grade II listed. Photo – Jempics

St Mary of the Harbour

So, there’s already some words written
about me as I am today
But there’s more to make the story
complete in every way
For once I was much bigger
cruciform in shape
Part of Shoreham’s presence
on the Sussex south landscape

St Mary of the Harbour
I was known as when first built
before my western transepts
fell to ruin with a tilt
Gone by medieval times
my nave in disrepair
My walls retained the choir
with the tower remaining there

Five hundred years have passed since then
yet still some vestige stands
reminding folk that once my size
was wonderful and grand
St Mary of the Harbour
I still stand proud and tall
The parish church of Shoreham
overlooking one and all

 

©Jemverse

See also Church – 29/11/17

Church

5 of 6 in the Jemverse ‘Shoreham’ series

Nine hundred years I’ve been here
in Shoreham’s ancient port
A Catholic church turned Anglican
the parish to support
My cruciform original has
crumbled over time
But what is left still standing
is still within its prime

©Jemverse

Continuing the Jemverse ‘Shoreham’ series, Church is about St Mary de Haura (St Mary of the Harbour) – the parish church of New Shoreham –  founded in 1096 by William de Braose, 1st Lord of Bramber. 

James Brindley

James Brindley was an engineer
born seventeen seventy-two
Who later, when he’d qualified
canals and water knew
He designed many aqueducts
and tunnels through the rocks
along with single traffic gates
in narrow water locks

Fitting then the Canal House
on Bridge Street, Birmingham
should bear his name upon the wall
with fitting epigram
For out there at the water’s edge
his gift to us remains
Where waterways and watercraft
pay homage to his name

©Jemverse

 

Gas Street Basin

The Gas Street Basin barges
look lovely in a line
Here in the heart of Birmingham
peaceful and sublime
Once this would have bristled
with industrial ingress
But now it is a haven
free from turmoil or distress
Testament to memory
preserved in the best way
And perfect for the passer-by
at any time of day

©Jemverse

 

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