Dodoitsu for Saturday rain

Concluding ‘The syllabic series 22’ from Jemverse (7 of 7)

Not that it ever left us
always there behind the grey
biding time for its return
drying up the rain

©Jemverse

[Dodoitsu is a non-rhyming Japanese poetic form with a syllabic sequence of 7 – 7 – 7 – 5]

Sedoka for Friday rain

6 of 7 in ‘The syllabic series 22’ from Jemverse

The promise came true
briefly today as sunshine
warming like a new blanket
returned like a smile
and a word from its pure heart
to lift our spirits again

©Jemverse

[Sedoka is a non-rhyming Japanese poetic form with a syllabic sequence of 5 – 7 – 7- 5 – 7 – 7]

Tanka for Thursday rain

5 of 7 in ‘The Syllabic series 22’ from Jemverse

And a raindrop fell
to add concentric circles
spreading into life
building its reserve today
for when the sunshine returns

©Jemverse

[Tanka is a non-rhyming Japanese poetic form with a syllabic sequence of 5 – 7 – 5 – 7 – 7]

Bussokuseki for Wednesday rain

4 of 7 in ‘The Syllabic series 22’ from Jemverse

Midweek and the rain
full of the early summer
remains with us still
Yet no daunting with it here
no sad disappointment
How could there be with this life?

©Jemverse

[Bussokuseki is a non-rhyming Japanese poetic form with a syllabic sequence of 5 – 7 – 5 – 7 – 7 – 7]

Haiku for Tuesday rain

3 of 7 in ‘The Syllabic series 22’ from Jemverse

There is sun today
or at very least promise
amidst the grey cloud

©Jemverse

[Haiku is a non-rhyming Japanese poetic form with a syllabic sequence of 5 – 7 – 5]

Jemaiku for Monday rain

2 of 7 in “The Syllabic series 22′ from Jemverse

As dawn breaks Monday morning
greeting silent world
I avoid the fresh puddles
and breathe the new day
filling my whole with its zest
a sustenance here

©Jemverse

[Jemaiku is a Japanese-inspired non-rhyming poetic form of my own design with a syllabic sequence of 7 – 5 – 7 – 5 – 7 – 5]

Katauta for Sunday Rain

1 of 7 in ‘The Syllabic series 22’ from Jemverse

And after the rain
petrichor is fragrant here
as dampened earth greets the sun

©Jemverse

[Katauta is a non-rhyming Japanese poetic form with a syllabic sequence of 5 – 7 – 7]

Six poetics #4 (Bussokuseki)

4 in a series of 6

And for Thursday here
with flamboyance there is a
‘bussokuseki’
The last of the Japanese
captured here in essence of
good writing’s ancient passing

©Jemverse

Bussokuseki is an archaic Japanese poetic device in which lines are written in a 5-7-5-7-7-7 ‘mora’ pattern

Photo – ‘Half Moon Bridge’ (1940) by Yoshida Toshi (1911-1995)

Six poetics #3 (Haiku)

3 in a series of 6

As midweek arrives
three of six poetics with
a ‘haiku’ today

©Jemverse

Haiku is a traditional non-rhyming Japanese poetic form comprising 17 syllables in a three line sequence of 5-7-5

Photo – ‘Half Moon Bridge’ (1940) by Yoshida Toshi (1911-1995

 

 

Six poetics #2 (Tanka)

2 in a series of 6

A ‘tanka’ today
as to the beach I return
for September sun
Basking in its warmth and light
for one more day of summer

©Jemverse

Tanka – Japanese expressive poetry comprising 31 syllables over 5 lines in a sequence of 5, 7, 5, 7, 7

Photo – ‘Half Moon Bridge’ (1940) by Yoshida Toshi (1911-1995

 

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