Tanka week VII (Saturday)

7 of 7

My tanka week ends
Seven days and many words
every one from heart
And every one fashioned here
for reading delectation

©Jemverse

[Tanka – Japanese expressive poetry comprising 31 syllables over 5 lines in a sequence of 5, 7, 5, 7, 7]

Photo – ‘Kamikochi Heights’ from the series “Eight Scenic views of Japan” by Koga Kano (1928)

 

Tanka week VI (Friday)

6 of 7

The penultimate
Nine lines more to speak my voice
Not to wane or waste
but here for ‘carpe diem’
Seize the day and capture all

©Jemverse

[Tanka – Japanese expressive poetry comprising 31 syllables over 5 lines in a sequence of 5, 7, 5, 7, 7]

Photo – ‘Kamikochi Heights’ from the series “Eight Scenic views of Japan” by Koga Kano (1928)

 

Tanka week V (Thursday)

5 of 7

And then to rhythm
with the timbre and syntax
sounding as a drum
with feet tapping to the beat
allows this tanka to speak

©Jemverse

[Tanka – Japanese expressive poetry comprising 31 syllables over 5 lines in a sequence of 5, 7, 5, 7, 7]

Photo – ‘Kamikochi Heights’ from the series “Eight Scenic views of Japan” by Koga Kano (1928)

 

Tanka week IV (Wednesday)

4 of 7

Sunshine speaks today
as its warmth embraces me
And compelled to sing
breathing deep I lift my voice
with these words I have to share

©Jemverse

[Tanka – Japanese expressive poetry comprising 31 syllables over 5 lines in a sequence of 5, 7, 5, 7, 7]

Photo – ‘Kamikochi Heights’ from the series “Eight Scenic views of Japan” by Koga Kano (1928)

Tanka week III (Tuesday)

3 of 7

For there’s mystery
at times when inspiration
speaks out loud and long
a challenge to the poet
to capture the moment true

©Jemverse

[Tanka – Japanese expressive poetry comprising 31 syllables over 5 lines in a sequence of 5, 7, 5, 7, 7]

Photo – ‘Kamikochi Heights’ from the series “Eight Scenic views of Japan” by Koga Kano (1928)

Tanka week II (Monday)

2 of 7

This week I will write
in thirty-one syllables
something every day
to capture joy and substance
in my words to speak and sing

©Jemverse

[Tanka – Japanese expressive poetry comprising 31 syllables over 5 lines in a sequence of 5, 7, 5, 7, 7]

Photo – ‘Kamikochi Heights’ from the series “Eight Scenic views of Japan” by Koga Kano (1928)

Tri-sedoka II (introducing II)

Sedoka, I thought
as in its syllabic form
it provides the structure to
be very precise
with the words I choose to say
and the theme I choose to give

Sedoka, I thought
Just thirty-eight syllables
to craft poetic beauty
be very concise
and think carefully about
all the words I want to use

Sedoka, I thought
Adequately fits today
and gives the reader something
as these words they rest
in these three given verses
to whet there an appetite

©Jemverse

Photo – Jempics

Sedoka is a Japanese poetic writing form comprising 38 syllables in a 5, 7, 7, 5, 7, 7 sequence

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