Six poetics #6 (Dalit)

6 in a series of 6

Six poetics come to an end
with Filipino ‘dalit’ here
This poet hopes you enjoyed
six explorations into verse

©Jemverse

Dalit’ is a traditional Filipino poetic form comprising four non-rhyming lines of 8 syllables

Photo – ‘Interaction’ by Victorio Edades (with Carlos V Francisco & Gala B Ocampo) 1935

Dalit week VII (Saturday)

7 of 7

And so to Saturday the end
of these few days of Dalit verse
Poetic mechanism new
for your experimentation

©Jemverse

Photo – ‘Interaction’ by Victorio Edades (with Carlos V Francisco & Gala B Ocampo) 1935

‘Dalit’ is a traditional Filipino poetic form comprising four non-rhyming lines of 8 syllables

Dalit week VI (Friday)

6 of 7

Hoorah it’s Friday here at last
Work will complete as lunchtime comes
And Friday’s field awaits us there
For joy to watch the dog run free

©Jemverse

Photo – ‘Interaction’ by Victorio Edades (with Carlos V Francisco & Gala B Ocampo) 1935

‘Dalit’ is a traditional Filipino poetic form comprising four non-rhyming lines of 8 syllables

Dalit week V (Thursday)

5 of 7

Those words for me were a bit deep
for yesterday when midweek came
So mellowing to Thursday now
today’s Dalit returns to form

©Jemverse

Photo – ‘Interaction’ by Victorio Edades (with Carlos V Francisco & Gala B Ocampo) 1935

‘Dalit’ is a traditional Filipino poetic form comprising four non-rhyming lines of 8 syllables

Dalit week IV (Wednesday)

4 of 7

Midweek already, that went fast
No time for slowing down just yet
though as there remains much to do
and industry waits for no one

©Jemverse

Photo – ‘Interaction’ by Victorio Edades (with Carlos V Francisco & Gala B Ocampo) 1935

‘Dalit’ is a traditional Filipino poetic form comprising four non-rhyming lines of 8 syllables

Dalit week III (Tuesday)

3 of 7

Tuesday is better than Monday
As there are but for til Friday
When yet another weekend waits
Patiently biding time until

©Jemverse

Photo – ‘Interaction’ by Victorio Edades (with Carlos V Francisco & Gala B Ocampo) 1935

‘Dalit’ is a traditional Filipino poetic form comprising four non-rhyming lines of 8 syllables

Dalit week II (Monday)

2 of 7

Monday morning I’m up at dawn
The world still slumbers and yet I
am wide awake to industry
Aiming for a lunchtime finish

©Jemverse

Photo – ‘Interaction’ by Victorio Edades (with Carlos V Francisco & Gala B Ocampo) 1935

‘Dalit’ is a traditional Filipino poetic form comprising four non-rhyming lines of 8 syllables

Dalit week I (Sunday)

1 of 7

So begins a week of Dalit
This Filipino poetry
Each four lines of eight syllables
Yet none here with rhyming stanzas

©Jemverse

Photo – ‘Interaction’ by Victorio Edades (with Carlos V Francisco & Gala B Ocampo) 1935

‘Dalit’ is a traditional Filipino poetic form comprising four non-rhyming lines of 8 syllables

Dalit IV (reverence)

Yes, this eloquence is precious
not for squandering or for waste
Revered as a diamond
with immeasurable value

©Jemverse

As a poet I’ve a keen interest in differing poetic form and syntax from around the world. From the Philippines then comes ‘Dalit’ – four non-rhyming lines of eight syllables , 32 in total. Jemverse features four examples this week – three days ago, the day before yesterday, yesterday and today.

Dalit III (precious)

Though fleeting with some beauty
precious is this captured moment
My soliloquy for the day
to seize and hold onto and keep

©Jemverse

As a poet I’ve a keen interest in differing poetic form and syntax from around the world. From the Philippines then comes ‘Dalit’ – four non-rhyming lines of eight syllables , 32 in total. Jemverse features four examples this week – the day before yesterday, yesterday, today and tomorrow.

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