Pining for summer

So, winter has me in its grip
and won’t let go right now
Her cold and icy fingers
spider-like across my brow
Shivering, I try to smile
and brave the worst of it
But winter’s not what I’m about
and never seems to fit

For I’m a child of summer
something that’s been said before
I clamour for the warmer months
when cold knocks at the door
I come alive with warming sun
I laugh within its glare
And always, always miss it
whenever it’s not there

©Jemverse

Photo – December frozen puddle at minus five degrees – Jempics

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St Mary of the Harbour

So, there’s already some words written
about me as I am today
But there’s more to make the story
complete in every way
For once I was much bigger
cruciform in shape
Part of Shoreham’s presence
on the Sussex south landscape

St Mary of the Harbour
I was known as when first built
before my western transepts
fell to ruin with a tilt
Gone by medieval times
my nave in disrepair
My walls retained the choir
with the tower remaining there

Five hundred years have passed since then
yet still some vestige stands
reminding folk that once my size
was wonderful and grand
St Mary of the Harbour
I still stand proud and tall
The parish church of Shoreham
overlooking one and all

 

©Jemverse

Photos – Jempics. Top – the ruins of the western transept walls. Bottom left – filled in nave arches against the standing tower and ruined nave walls. Bottom right – St Mary of the Harbour today. See also Church – 29/11/17

Mother Nature (1) – Lavender

Celebrating nature over
seven vibrant days
Her hand of wonder covered
in seven different ways

And today I start with lavender
my favourite by far
Its colour and its fragrance
to which I am particular

Epitomising summer
there’s a synergy right there
which, with sachets of its seed I can
throughout the seasons share

©Jemverse

From 3 through 10 December, Jemverse has seven poems to celebrate Mother Nature’s hand – a different wonder every day. Photo – Jempics

Complete

6 of 6 in the Jemverse ‘Shoreham’ series

There’s a view which here in Shoreham
is complete in every way
as it epitomises
all about the place, I’d say
It looks across the river
to the church up in the town
Enough to always take away
a trace of any frown
It’s a view which brings me pleasure
coupled with a sense of pride
of Shoreham here in Sussex
the place where I reside

©Jemverse

‘Complete’ aptly completes the Jemverse ‘Shoreham’ series. You can no longer see this actual view of Shoreham, so I’m really pleased I captured it in January 2012. In September that year, the old 1920’s footbridge was closed, demolished and eventually replaced by the new Adur Ferry bridge. The footings for the new bridge differ, changing the view of the town. Still good but not quite as iconic.

Church

5 of 6 in the Jemverse ‘Shoreham’ series

Nine hundred years I’ve been here
in Shoreham’s ancient port
A Catholic church turned Anglican
the parish to support
My cruciform original has
crumbled over time
But what is left still standing
is still within its prime

©Jemverse

Continuing the Jemverse ‘Shoreham’ series, Church is about St Mary de Haura (St Mary of the Harbour) – the parish church of New Shoreham –  founded in 1096 by William de Braose, 1st Lord of Bramber. Photo – Jempics

Big Ben’s bell is silent

Big Ben’s bell is silent
no chimes upon the hour
And all wrapped up in scaffolding
right around the tower

It needs a lot of TLC
to bring it back to scratch
but is missed by all commuters
who have a train to catch

For Big Ben’s peel, familiar
gave them the time of day
and helped them keep to schedule
as they went upon their way

But now they’ll need to wait four years
’til Big Ben chimes again
Except for extra special times
which happen now and then

©Jemverse

Big Ben is actually the nickname for the Great Bell of the clock in the tower at the north end of the Palace of Westminster in London. The tower is now officially the Elizabeth Tower, renamed to celebrate the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II in 2012; previously it was known simply as the Clock Tower. In August 2017 a four-year period of renovation of the tower and the clock began, and the bells were silenced. They’ll still peel on special occasions like New Year though. 

Photo – Jempics

James Brindley

James Brindley was an engineer
born seventeen seventy-two
Who later, when he’d qualified
canals and water knew
He designed many aqueducts
and tunnels through the rocks
along with single traffic gates
in narrow water locks

Fitting then the Canal House
on Bridge Street, Birmingham
should bear his name upon the wall
with fitting epigram
For out there at the water’s edge
his gift to us remains
Where waterways and watercraft
pay homage to his name

©Jemverse

Photo – The Canal House pub (formerly ‘The James Brindley’) (and before that, a canal storehouse and boat works), Bridge Street, Birmingham – Jempics

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