The Canalhouse

It’s quite a surprise
when popping in for a beer
to find that the pub
has its own canal here!

But that’s just the case
here in Nottingham city
Though a former museum
had to close, more’s the pity

The Canalhouse though
with clever adaption
keeps the history alive
with its central attraction

©Jemverse

The Canalhouse on the Nottingham Canal in Canal Street, Nottingham, UK is a former canal museum. The site is now home to Nottingham’s Castle Rock Brewery and its flagship pub. The Grade II listed building retains much of its former heritage, including a branch of the Nottingham Canal complete with resident barges which splits its interior. Photos – Jempics

A test of time

Against the blue the old Town Hall
with yellow ochre walls
Declares aloud his history
from ageing hallowed halls
In Brighton now amidst the new
it stands aloof to change
Whilst all around the architects
make plans to rearrange

And yet its walls have stood the test
that time has often posed
So here it is with confidence
and will stay put, I suppose
A pleasing thought to keep in mind
as history remains
With old and new together
and memories retained

©Jemverse

Photo – Brighton Town Hall, Bartholomew Square, West facia – Jempics

In Constable’s footsteps

Went to Brighton to see the original
on short loan from the Tate
It’s quite a lot bigger than the one on my wall
and to see it there was great

A Constable retrospective
representing four years’ toils
When he lived right here in Brighton
with some drawings and some oils

It was a special privilege
to see these works all here
and in particular for me
the original ‘Chain Pier’

©Jemverse

Photo – my print copy of John Constable’s ‘The Chain Pier, Brighton’ (1826-27) ; Tate Britain – Jempics

John Constable took lodgings in Brighton between 1824 and 1828 during which he drew and painted a lot of what he saw around him. ‘In Constable’s Footsteps’ at Brighton Museum brings all of that output together for the first time in an exhibition running until 8 October 2017.

The Chain Pier was Brighton’s first pier. Built in 1823 but destroyed by a storm in 1896, you can still see remains of its oak pilings at very low tides today.

Lincoln Tranquil

I’m at Lawress Hall in Lincolnshire
the county of the green
Midst the pride of England’s glory
quite the best that’s to be seen

And although the buildings here are new
the lake tells tales of old
When here in Medieval times
knights were brave and bold

There are echoes here of history
from Roman times ’til now
Yet the stillness of tranquility
lives through the years somehow

©Jemverse

Photo – the lake at Lawress Hall, Riseholme Park, Lincolnshire – Jempics

The Princes Square Peacock

The Princes Square peacock
in full Art Nouveau
looks down from on high
to the people below

And Buchanan Street shoppers
as they venture within
can gaze up to its wonder
with a smile or a grin

For it simply commands
with its wonderful form
that looking up with a smile
is completely the norm

©Jemverse

Princes Square is a shopping centre on Buchanan Street in central Glasgow, Scotland. It was first designed and built in the 1840s by John Baird and other architects, but was re-developed in 1986 to a design by Edinburgh architects, the Hugh Martin Partnership. The decorative peacock was added in 1990 as a contribution to the City of Culture Festival in Glasgow that year.

Photo – Jempics

Argyll Street

Central station, Argyll Street
running through the city
towers in its grandeur still
above the street and pretty

Once proudly known at Westergait
and over two miles long
Four hundred years of history
adds to Glasgow’s song

And though its heritage has changed
with progress over time
It’s vista is undaunted as
Argyll Street still looks fine

©Jemverse

Photo (Jempics) – Central Station, Argyll Street Bridge, Glasgow. Opened in 1879. Extended in 1901. Originally known as Westergait, Argyll Street led west from Trongate to the city’s West Port, the western gate out of the city’s walls. It was renamed in honour of the Duke of Argyll, some time after the removal of the West Port in 1751, as a result of the expansion of the city westward.

Day Four (Rodmell to Alfriston)

Arriving here at Alfriston
we found the Smugglers Inne
A sixteenth century ale house
for the sale of beer and gin
And although it’s not imposing
many secrets here it hides
for behind its small exterior
more than twenty rooms inside

And more than forty doors
with six staircases to boot
All there to fool the Customs Men
when hiding all the loot
For us though there was purpose
which provided lots of cheer
A welcome stopping point to rest
and have a well-earned beer

©Jemverse

Over five days, starting on Tuesday 2 May, my brother and I walked the second half of the South Downs Way – from Washington in West Sussex to Eastbourne in East Sussex. Day four was from Rodmell to Alfriston.

The Smugglers Inne at Alfriston has late 16th century origins and was originally called ‘The Crossstone Beerhouse’. In the early 19th century it was home to one Stanton Collins, the leader of the Alfriston gang of smugglers, who extensively remodelled its interior to provide hiding places and boltholes from the Customs Men. It has 21 rooms, 48 doors and 6 staircases. Photo – Jempics.

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