Brighton Greenway

High above the Brighton streets
on the old railway bed
Through the locomotive works
the Brighton Greenway led

The engines left here long ago
but their memory remains
Homage paid by sculptor’s hand
to Brighton’s long lost trains

©Jemverse

The Brighton Greenway follows the trackbed of a branch line that once led through the steam locomotive works based in Brighton. The ‘Ghost Train’ was sculpted by John Mills and is a homage to the ‘Jenny Lind’, a 2-2-2 locomotive designed in 1847. Photo – Jempics

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Iron Lighthouse

On the north sea coast at Harwich
Iron lighthouse in the sea
Built to replace the old one
back in eighteen sixty-three

Here are sandy beaches
but the sea looks just the same
As is does down on the Southern coast
where I’ll soon be home again

©Jemverse

The ‘High’ and ‘Low’ Lighthouses on Dovercourt’s shore at Harwich were built in 1863 as a pair after the two Lighthouses at Harwich, which worked on a similar principal of being aligned by the mariner to mark safe passage had become inacurate and dangerously misleading. Pictured is the ‘low’ one of the pair. Photo – Jempics.

The Corinth Canal

Part 15 of 20 in ‘The Aegean Shores’ series

The boat was somewhat smaller
but the view was just as fine
Confirming that our choice today
was a wise one made this time

For today instead of Athens
to Corinth our decision
The canal to link the Adriatic
and Aegean with precision

Nineteenth century engineering
shown to be the best
Breathtaking there in every way
to which this view attests

©Jemverse

The Corinth Canal connects the the Gulf of Corinth with the Saronic Gulf in the Aegean Sea. It cuts through the narrow Isthmus of Corinth and separates the Peloponnese from the Greek mainland. Construction started in 1881 and completed in 1893. Four miles long but only 70ft wide at its base, it’s used mainly now for small craft and pleasure trips. Still impressive though. Photo – Jempics

[This is part 15 of a 20-part series charting a seven-day cruise with Tui from 11-18 August 2017, travelling from London to Corfu, then Kalamata (Greece), Santorini, Rhodes, Crete, Piraeus (Greece), Kefalonia, Corfu and London, some 3,870 nautical miles]

Mandraki Harbour

Part 8 of 20 in ‘The Aegean Shores’ series

On Rhodes, the ancient city
build in medieval time
reflects the yellow of the sun
in every way, divine

Windmills on the harbour wall
once caught the southern breeze
Their ancient sails now still of course
beside Aegean seas

And in Mandraki harbour
where Colossus may have stood
I walked beside those windmills
because today I simply could

©Jemverse

Photo – me by one of the three windmills on the Mandraki Harbour wall, Rhodes – Monday 14 August 2017  – picture by Sally Croucher

[This is part 8 of a 20-part series charting a seven-day cruise with Tui from 11-18 August 2017, travelling from London to Corfu, then Kalamata (Greece), Santorini, Rhodes, Crete, Piraeus (Greece), Kefalonia, Corfu and London, some 3,870 nautical miles]

The Canalhouse

It’s quite a surprise
when popping in for a beer
to find that the pub
has its own canal here!

But that’s just the case
here in Nottingham city
Though a former museum
had to close, more’s the pity

The Canalhouse though
with clever adaption
keeps the history alive
with its central attraction

©Jemverse

The Canalhouse on the Nottingham Canal in Canal Street, Nottingham, UK is a former canal museum. The site is now home to Nottingham’s Castle Rock Brewery and its flagship pub. The Grade II listed building retains much of its former heritage, including a branch of the Nottingham Canal complete with resident barges which splits its interior. Photos – Jempics

A test of time

Against the blue the old Town Hall
with yellow ochre walls
Declares aloud his history
from ageing hallowed halls
In Brighton now amidst the new
it stands aloof to change
Whilst all around the architects
make plans to rearrange

And yet its walls have stood the test
that time has often posed
So here it is with confidence
and will stay put, I suppose
A pleasing thought to keep in mind
as history remains
With old and new together
and memories retained

©Jemverse

Photo – Brighton Town Hall, Bartholomew Square, West facia – Jempics

In Constable’s footsteps

Went to Brighton to see the original
on short loan from the Tate
It’s quite a lot bigger than the one on my wall
and to see it there was great

A Constable retrospective
representing four years’ toils
When he lived right here in Brighton
with some drawings and some oils

It was a special privilege
to see these works all here
and in particular for me
the original ‘Chain Pier’

©Jemverse

Photo – my print copy of John Constable’s ‘The Chain Pier, Brighton’ (1826-27) ; Tate Britain – Jempics

John Constable took lodgings in Brighton between 1824 and 1828 during which he drew and painted a lot of what he saw around him. ‘In Constable’s Footsteps’ at Brighton Museum brings all of that output together for the first time in an exhibition running until 8 October 2017.

The Chain Pier was Brighton’s first pier. Built in 1823 but destroyed by a storm in 1896, you can still see remains of its oak pilings at very low tides today.

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